This Spring will be Celebrated in Pixels!

Ah, there you are; we thought we would catch your eye here!  With apologies to Mr. Gutenberg and his early printing press, we’ve decided to offer our traditional Spring brochure as a digital presentation only—as we feel we’ll also be seeing most of you in person next month at the historic Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, and where we’ll have many of these weights for you to examine in person!  But in the meantime, if one of these hypnotic Hunter and romantic Ruzsa creations (or any of the other delightful selections) appeal to you, we would recommend acquiring them now to avoid disappointment!

After paging through the booklet, click New Arrivals to see more images and videos of each piece.


 

Arrive here looking for the time/date/link-to information on the Fall Auction? CLICK HERE

If you haven’t seen the video yet, click play below, it’s worth it!

Arrive here looking for the time/date/link-to information on the Fall Auction? CLICK HERE

If not… time for Some Completely Unwarranted Musings about AUCTION 80!

Welcome back, to our First Ever LH Selman Paperweight Auction 80!  And, in a world and at a time where more and more auction houses are abandoning the production of well-printed, full color, and informative catalogues, LH Selman has carried the torch into the 22nd year of the 21st Century.  We hope you’ll spend some time enjoying our efforts.   Also, please avail yourselves of Marty’s carefully created online videos! And always call with any questions! We’re also pleased to provide detailed close-ups of weights upon request.

YES, IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN AND WE KNOW YOU’RE ALL REALLY BUSY, EITHER SHOVELING SNOW OR LOOKING FOR THAT LITTLE UMBRELLA TO STIR YOUR POOLSIDE COCKTAIL, SO IF YOU MAKE IT ALL THE WAY THROUGH READING ABOUT LOT 1, (WHICH REALLY DESERVES THE FULL TREATMENT) – THE REST WILL BE REALLY BRIEF THIS TIME!

 

THANK YOU, THE MANAGEMENT.

 

LOT 1. Rare antique Mount Washington pink camellia and forget-me-not wreath magnum paperweight.

WHAT DO MOUNT WASHINGTON, PARISIAN COURTESANS, VERDI’S LA TRAVIATA, GRETA GARBO AND THE SON OF THE GUY WHO WROTE THE

 THREE MUSKETEERS HAVE IN COMMON??  WE’RE GLAD YOU ASKED…

Okay. Okay.  First let me say right up front I lied.  Technically I lied when I swore last time around that the remarkable Lot No. 1 Mount Washington American weight was the only American antique you’d ever need.   We stand here now with another stunning weight you also need!  Who Knew?  This stunning artwork offers a flower of multiple, sweet pinks – munificent petals as soft as lips and flowing in all directions.  Two young sister bulbs hold promise of similar ebullience. Rich blue forget-me-nots surround in playful protection.  This is a sumptuous masterwork.  If Jean-Antoine Watteau made paperweights, he’d have made this one! Quite a sensual success for the hard Yankees and flinty landscape of New England to bring to sultry life!

AND, with THIS Lot 1, at no extra charge large, you get bragging rights over entire chunks of priceless western culture. What economists refer to as the intangible values; you know – it’s kind of like an NFT, or Non-Fungible-Token. You own something but you don’t.  Check out the cheap champagne-induced logic that follows and flows here –

The Lady of the Camellias was an insanely popular novel by Alexandre Dumas’ son, Al Jr., and was inspired by the author’s love for the real-life nineteenth-century courtesan Marie Duplessis – known to all as “the Lady of the Camellias” because she is never seen without her favorite flower.  “One of the greatest love stories of all time,” according to Henry James.  It was the inspiration for Verdi’s opera La Traviata, and the Oscar-winning musical Moulin Rouge!  Numerous ballets, stage productions and Hollywood films included stars such as Lillian Gish, Greta Garbo, Sarah Bernhardt, Rudolph Valentino and Isabelle Huppert, to name just a few! Leave it to the French and Italians to create tragic passion out of a flower known for peace and calm.

You can now add to the list of famous artworks above, this monumental American antique magnum, containing – Yes, the Camellia!  In the novel, Marguerite Gautier is the most beautiful, brazen, and expensive courtesan in all of Paris. But despite having many lovers, she has never really loved—until she meets Armand Duval, young, handsome, and hopelessly in love with her.  And now you, yes, YOU, can step up and claim her spirit in this truly American glass cornerstone that is the embodiment of European culture.  What, you protest, what has that to do with New England Yankee American art?  Don’t be narrow-minded.  Don’t we claim French fries?

 

LOT 3.   Rare antique Bacchus close concentric red and white millefiori paperweight.

ENGLISH GLASS FOR AN ENGLISH LASS!

Sometimes the simplest combinations result in the most sophisticated designs.  Here we have very delicate reds decorating an elegant, antique white landscape with ruffles and sparkling stars.  This looks somewhat like it might have accompanied the embroidery worn by an elegant Elizabethan era royal, modeling for her portrait in miniature by Nicholas Hilliard.  How fitting that it’s Bacchus!

 

LOT 9.    Rare antique Baccarat interlaced millefiori trefoil garlands and Gridel silhouette overlay faceted paperweight.

“NOW, IS YA COMIN’ ALONG, QUIET-LIKE, …OR DOES I HAVETA MUSS YA UP, SUM…?”

(100 points if you can match this title to the clue below.) *

If, on October 4th, the Feast of Saint Francis, you keep choosing your proud, strutting rooster for the annual blessing of the animals, then this weight has your name on it. And if your favorite Warner Brother’s cartoon character was Foghorn Leghorn,*  or if your favorite literary character in Chaucer is Chanticleer, or if Chick-fil-A is your go-to restaurant, then look no further for the new centerpiece of your paperweight collection.  This Baccarat has a lacy, light and airy construction, with generous facets to allow complete access to the design.  I do worry a bit about the graceful trefoil garlands around those claws.  Hens extra.

 

LOT 17.   Very rare antique Baccarat “Légion d’honneur” enameled gold-foil medal paperweight.

… The HISTORY BOOK ON THE SHELF,

IS ALWAYS REPEATING ITSELF…. abba

The two collecting areas of military memorabilia and antique paperweights come together in this Francophile’s dream artwork of Napoleon’s handsome Legion of Honor medal encased in Baccarat glass.  We’ll try to remember to enclose an application for French citizenship with the package. But before you get too dreamy-eyed, remember that this was the same year he got himself declared First Consul for Life.  Two years later, he declared himself Emperor. Not Good.  In between, in 1803 he authorized the Louisiana Purchase for pocket change to the United States to pay for his military campaigns.  How smart did that turn out to be? But this may your only chance to acquire this badge of honor without having paid for it with frostbite while occupying a burning Moscow, and unable to remember when you last had rations.

 

LOT 18.   Antique Saint Louis two-colored crown paperweight.

SEND IN THE CROWNS, THERE OUGHT TO BE CROWNS!

 “The CROWN” (Netflix), Crown Royal Reserve, [Ford] Crown Victoria, Crowning Achievement,

Crowning Moment, – You get the picture.  “Crown” is a word that evokes importance and high achievement in our history and culture, from fearsome cars and great television to the finest whiskey (okay, yes, and the actual Crown).

Here we have an excellently constructed Crown Paperweight, with exquisitely produced spirals cascading voluptuously down into the shape of (you guessed it) a Crown!  A truly excellent example of a classic weight.  That still leaves us to deal with why Crown Point, Indiana, known only for having no waiting period for marriage licenses – got in on the name?!

With apologies to the memory of Stephen Sondheim for the cringeworthy borrowing.

 THE MANAGEMENT.

 

LOT 44.   Antique Clichy purple and white swirl paperweight.

YOU CAN WEATHER THIS STORM

Resembling nothing so much as a hurricane in your hand with a stately eye of blues and whites, this glass-inspired rip in the fabric of space-time is understandably hypnotic. The luxurious deep purples surprise the eye as the strands reveal themselves, because at a glance, the weight can easily appear to be black and white.  Holding it to the light also showcases the elegantly constructed geometry.  And it’s safe to enjoy, unlike the hurricanes outside.

 

LOT 67.   Antique New England Glass Company 1852 millefiori nosegay and garland with folded date canes paperweight.

ANTEBELLUM HISTORY AND ART

What, you ask, happened of importance in the year 1852 in these here United States?  Well, there was a presidential election but that was overshadowed by 2 even more profound events!

One was that the book Uncle Tom’s Cabin was published in Boston.  But the real reason to remember 1852, is that some magnificent Yankees created this NEGC paperweight with the popular nosegay design, and as a bonus – included the world’s smallest date cane which no one but our own Penelope would ever have found.  (Those electron microscopes come in handy.)  Smaller than a virus and disguised as a bee, this date cane appears not once but twice in this treasure! (No that’s not a nanobot in there.)  So, if you want a real American artwork with a claim to historical importance, look no further.

 

LOT 90.    David Graeber and Ed Poore 2014 collaborative lilac, arum calla chrysanthemums and berries heart-shaped basket

DOUBLE POINTS IF YOU BID ON VALENTINE’S DAY

Simply too stunning to describe.  If your love burns half as bright as this peerless symbol of eternal affection, you are indeed fortunate.  The lush, brilliantly created design by Dave Graeber is positioned high enough in the glass that Ed’s faceted undercarriage gleams as it gathers up all the light in the room and channels it into a surrounding caress of infinite points of sparkles. Honestly, if I were going to really give this artwork its praise in full measure, you’d be reading for days.  I’m showing true restraint today. You likely don’t deserve this weight, but legally you get the same chance as everyone else to acquire it!

 

LOT 99.   Gordon Smith 2003 “Gila Monster” lizard and coral snake eggs paperweight.

IN THE DESERT, ONE CITIZEN’S HOME INVASION IS SIMPLY ANOTHER’S LUNCH BREAK.

Why is the Gila monster choosing to acquire the eggs of a coral snake, which has the second most lethal venom of all snakes?  Maybe it’s because the coral snake is the only venomous snake that even lays eggs!!  With exquisitely detailed and contrasting scales that almost pulsate and offer a sense of impending motion even in its perfect glassy stillness, the prehistoric desert dweller pauses as if to alert us as to the possible negative consequences of our intrusion. He’s toxic as well, but we verified that he’d never hurt his foster family – so it’s safe to acquire this stunning tableau.

 

LOT 107.   Rick Ayotte 2004 “Abundance” chrysanthemum and berry bouquet paperweight.

HE USED EVERY CRAYON IN THE BOX

Did you ever toss and turn at night, wondering and opining as to how they figured out the unusual numbers of Crayola Crayons to offer in each different set?  Me neither.  But I did love the feel of a new box, however, and the promises it contained…. But I digress.  The point here is that Rick Ayotte has outdone himself, using every single color in the big set of crayons to create this jazzy rainbow of flowers, berries and leaves.  This bushel exudes light!  Perfect placements.  Perfect highlights and contrasts show the relaxed hand of a master.

 

LOT 120.   Charles Kaziun Junior and Pairpoint collaborative etched wine decanter bottle with matching drinking glasses and red crimp rose stopper.

HERE’S YOUR EXCUSE TO FINALLY HOST THAT 2-YEAR POSTPONED DINNER PARTY!

With clean contemporary glass design, and adorned with robustly etched floral designs that tip the hat to the classic, this is a perfect excuse to entertain, whether your guests love art glass or glass art!  Charles Kaziun Junior thought it was a great idea!  He proudly left a signature cane in the stopper. And master engraver Otto Carl Banks, who worked for Pairpoint in the middle of the last century, has signed near the base, “OCB.” Get the set a raise a toast to two gifted men who made things!

 

LOT 131.   Victor Trabucco 1984 yellow daffodil paperweight.

A FORETASTE OF THE METAVERSE?

STOP! See, you almost passed this by. Don’t be fooled by simplicity. This gleaming daffodil and its ground use brilliantly contrasting colors to create a real sense of extra-dimensional viewing.  A BOLD visual!  I had to touch my face to make certain I wasn’t wearing an augmented reality headset.  This seeming hologram is also one of the happiest weights of all time; this weight can actually make you believe in Happy Endings.

 

LOT 134.    Ken Rosenfeld 2010 snail and flowers paperweight.

WE ALL NEED TO SLOW DOWN A BIT, DON’T YOU AGREE?

 A happy and handsome snail with a lovely, variegated shell that is remindful of the strata

displayed on river canyon walls, luxuriates in a garden of perfectly executed plants and flowers.

This little guy should have been in the film, “Fantasia,” somewhere between the delicately demure dancing hippos and the softly flowing mushroom people.  Don’t hesitate; he may move slowly, but he could be gone quickly!

 

LOT 145.   Chris Buzzini 1997 upright all-over bouquet and roots block-faceted paperweight.

BUZZINI BONANZA

 It’s not like Chris needs my help in pointing out his high caliber works that understandably might have you all letting the air out of each other’s car tires in order to get yourselves a head start at the auction gate!  (Aren’t you glad our auctions don’t work like that?) But I’d be remiss not to tip my hat to this colorful compact garden complete with gorgeous flowers, delicately detailed soil, and a trio of fecund pods protecting more garden life yet to realize itself.  The unusual beveling on this masterwork serves the design particularly well.  Enough garden here to make you smile all winter.  Leave the tools in the shed.  Oh, and we have 5 more!

 

LOT 191.     Abelman 1980 iridescent pulled-feather surface design paperweight.

YOUR HEART’S AS LIGHT AS A FEATHER!  WELL, WHAT ABOUT YOUR SOUL?

Take a third and fourth look.   Art Nouveau with Art Deco are partnered in this pulled-feather paperweight and reach their combined zenith, dare we say their literal acmes, in this glorious surface design paperweight!  The shapes and lines are pure Nouveau and the color palette, the iridescent finishes and clean crisp contrasts are pure Deco.  And all of it is gloriously … handmade.  They haven’t created the machines that can create this handcrafted magic…yet!  (That will take several more months…) Speaking of magic, In Egyptian mythology, your right to an afterlife is judged against the weight of a feather. If your soul is heavier than the feather, Ammit the Devourer gets to eat your soul. (Word on the street has it that he then flosses with your dreams.)  So, besides bringing you aesthetic joy, this stunning weight can be a daily reminder to live a positive and selfless existence!

 

LOT 205.     Saint Louis 1996 “Aquarium” dimensional millefiori fish high-domed paperweight.

PLEASE LOOK OUT FOR A THREE-BEDROOM AQUARIUM

Word on the street has it that this munificent, psychedelically colored denizen of the Deep was being considered as a model for its own line of Steiff stuffed play pals.  Pixar has been also been calling. Get the idea?  This is a sumptuous and endearing creature.  And yet, there is a knowing look, just a bit of worldliness in the eyes that really marks this as a companion for adults as much as, if not more than for children.  Still, once your grandchildren see this, they’ll be waiting to fight over it one day. Actually your grown children will be the prior problem.  Make your will very clear.

 

LOT 314.     Perthshire paperweights 2000 close packed picture canes paperweight.

EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY, DON’T IT?

 It took the longest time to choose something from this part of the auction to share a note about.  Why?  Because there are so, so many weights of a high caliber regardless of where they fall on our pages.  We work hard to assemble the finest possible selection for each auction This lot features a marvelous storybook in glass with 54 chapters is a complete joy to contemplate in your hand. With the harmonious pastel picture canes resembling children’s building blocks, the effect is to amuse the eye, lower your blood pressure, and make you start dreaming. Picasso said, “It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”  He also said Michelangelo at various other times, but you get the point. Break out the Crayolas!

 

Okay, I could go on but there’s an auction to offer.  So please just remember three things.

Watch Marty’s videos, they’re handsome, brief (15-20 seconds) and informative.  Then, call us for extra still shots and blow-ups of any weight you like.  Then call with any specific questions about any of the lots or questions about auction protocols or anything else. And have FUN!

 

 

 

 


TO BUY AT RESERVE CLICK HERE : AUCTION WEBSITE

LIST OF UNSOLD LOTS AT RESERVE PRICES TO PURCHASE : HERE

L.H. Selman, Ltd.’s  Winter 2022, 80th Glass Paperweight Auction, featuring 360 lots, antique and modern, as well as choice paperweight-related objects has moved into the Buy-At-Reserve stage Monday March 21st. All unsold lots are available to purchase at their reserve price.

The auction is fully online, hosted on our AUCTION WEBSITE. A web friendly digital e-catalog can be viewed at E-CATALOG, while a printed copy of the catalog is for sale at PRINT-CATALOG. For those of you who have enjoyed watching spin videos of featured pieces, they can be accessed via our YouTube Channel. If you see something to your liking, please do not fail to place an initial bid in order to ensure that you have a position in the competitive bidding that follows in the second half of the auction. Competitive bidding concludes after each lot closes, whereby the Buy-At-Reserve stage commences offering all unsold lots at their reserve prices.

If you’re new to our auctions, or if you would just like a refresher, we recently put together a video explaining the auction process. So we encourage you to watch for a full explanation of our unique slow close auctions, including the different stages, rules and processes. And please call us at (312) 583-1177 if you have any questions

We recommend that you give the catalog’s Conditions of Sale a careful examination for a full understanding of the protocols. A key for condition statements can be found in the Conditions of Sale page in the catalog. Please call the gallery with any questions about these changes or the auction format, and don’t forget, we’re always happy to send additional images, videos or condition reports upon request.

We are currently open to visit by appointment only, so please get in touch to schedule a time to see every lot in person at our gallery in Chicago, 410 S. Michigan Ave., suite 207. If you prefer to place any or all bids by phone, or have any questions, just give us a call at 1-800-538-0766.

Auction 80 Showreel

For those of you who have enjoyed watching spin videos of featured pieces, they can be accessed via our YouTube Channel. Or look for a link in the description of a lot indicating a video has been provided.


Greetings, Friends!

And isn’t it amazing to think that we are already about to end the 21st year of the 21st century — but here we are…

And looking back over the last 12 months, we’d like to happily acknowledge the privilege of assisting you all in your very individual and passionate pursuits of fine art glass paperweights, and to affirm the pleasures of our continuing relationships.  2021 also saw an increase in new paperweight admirers, a testament to the allure of this magical and eternal artform.

As we exhale briefly from a busy year, the Selman Gallery will be closed from Thursday, December 23 until Monday, January 3rd.  Our Web Store will remain open, however, and we will be shipping incrementally.  As the New Year dawns, we will be back here in person, open by casual appointment and hoping to also see many of you, whom we’ve missed for too long, in person again. Until then!

Wishing You All the Very Best Holidays!

Ben, Penelope, Marty & Paul

 

 


 

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Larry Selman

December 11, 1938 – September 20, 2021  

“Make Every Day Count”

 

Our​​ beloved husband, father, brother, colleague, and best friend, slipped away peacefully at his home in Santa Cruz, California, surrounded by his family. For many months, Larry​​ held​​ insatiably​​ to life, because he​​ simply loved​​ living—on every level.​​ Recently he​​ was busy with many projects—adding more solar power​​ to​​ the house, taking​​ magnificent​​ photographs, practicing the viola da gamba,​​ studying music theory,​​ redesigning our front yard with beautiful succulent plants, and playing Pokémon with the grandkids and other aficionados of the game. Honestly, we all thought we would have more time together.

 

The last few months, this has been his daily mantra: “Make every day count.” And we did. His three-year journey with pancreatic cancer changed everything. We made every moment count.​​ During​​ his​​ last few days, he was telling​​ everyone, “There are only two things that matter: Having work that you love, and finding the right partner.” He said how lucky he was to have​​ found​​ both.​​ 

 

Larry is survived by Marti Selman, his devoted wife of 32 years;​​ son Matthew David (Matisse) Selman, daughter-in-law Daniela Selman, grandsons Mason Lawrence Selman and Dashiell Jean Selman; son Noah Jordan Selman, daughter-in-law Sarah Selman, grandchildren Isaiah Clive Overson, Jacqueline Ruby Overson, and Khiaan J. Selman; sister Kay Ellen (Kelly) Selman, brother-in-law Robin Wallace, of Gainesville, Florida; first wife Linda Pope of Aptos; and a host of extended family and friends who will carry him in their hearts forever.​​ 

 

Born in Cleveland, Ohio to Evelyn and Morton Selman, Larry attended public schools​​ in Cleveland Heights​​ and​​ earned a Bachelor’s degree at Kenyon College,​​ after which he spent a year​​ abroad​​ studying chemistry​​ at University College, London. He​​ then went on to earn a Master’s degree and PhD in organic chemistry at Yale University.​​ After a brief career in teaching, Larry​​ discovered​​ by chance​​ what would become his career for the next​​ four decades.​​ 

 

 

In the late​​ 1960s,​​ Larry​​ found himself at a personal crossroads. With​​ his​​ PhD in organic chemistry (thanks to the persistence of his dedicated mother, Evy),​​ he was torn between the prospect of an academic career,​​ and​​ his​​ true​​ passion—playing​​ Renaissance and Baroque​​ music.​​ Larry​​ felt he​​ needed to make a choice. ​​​​ One day,​​ a​​ friend in the early music world​​ introduced​​ him​​ to one of his collections: glass paperweights. Larry was immediately​​ enthralled​​ by these small​​ objets d’art​​ and began buying and selling them​​ as a hobby,​​ which​​ in time​​ evolved into a​​ career.​​ 

 

During the Renaissance, skills and talents from many fields of expertise were combined into lives of extraordinary creativity.​​ Eventually, Larry​​ solved​​ his career​​ dilemma​​ by​​ choosing​​ “all of the above,​​ following the​​ path of innovators from the Renaissance era,​​ whose​​ hauntingly beautiful,​​ complex​​ music​​ had smitten him. In other words, why not​​ continue​​ to be a scholar​​ of many things, play​​ early​​ music, and….​​ deal in​​ collectible​​ glass paperweights!

 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ A picture containing person, indoor

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Larry​​ will be remembered by​​ collectors​​ around the world​​ for his work​​ in the field of​​ fine​​ glass paperweights, where he devoted​​ himself​​ to​​ education about​​ the art form​​ and​​ to​​ fostering​​ emerging​​ artists who created​​ these small treasures.​​ In 1969,​​ he founded L. H. Selman, Ltd. which began as a kitchen-table mail-order business with his first wife, Linda Pope, who co-authored his first book,​​ Paperweights for Collectors.​​ Through​​ the publication of high-quality brochures,​​ special​​ photographic techniques​​ and​​ advertising,​​ participation​​ in​​ antique shows,​​ and collectors’ meetings​​ and festivals,​​ L. H. Selman, Ltd. became the world’s​​ premier purveyor of both antique and contemporary glass paperweights.​​ For years, Larry​​ regularly traveled to London auctions to​​ bid for clients​​ or​​ to purchase​​ rarities​​ for​​ his collectors.​​ He wrote​​ numerous​​ definitive​​ books​​ about​​ the art form, and published​​ many other​​ titles​​ under his publishing house,​​ Paperweight Press.​​ 

 

Throughout his career as an art dealer, Larry drew on his lifelong skills as a photographer, figuring out the best ways to photograph glass. (He had​​ created​​ a dark room in his childhood home in Cleveland when he was fifteen). The exceptional quality of his photos set the standard among the paperweight world.​​ Always the innovator,​​ Larry was the first paperweight dealer to have a website.​​ This was in the early days of the internet, when building a website required months of laborious and unforgiving attention to detail. Larry​​ actually wrote the computer code himself, in the late hours on his home computer. He was the first paperweight dealer to establish an online auction. On two occasions, these auctions held the world record for the highest price realized for a rare antique glass paperweight.​​ 

 

Eventually the mail order / auction business evolved into a beautiful glass gallery in downtown Santa Cruz. The shop became a mecca for paperweight collectors from around the world who came to attend many festivals and other paperweight-related events which were​​ hosted​​ here.​​ He fostered a collaborative work environment where his small staff could​​ actively participate, and enjoy their work as much as he did.

 

In 2009, Larry decided​​ that after 40 years​​ it was time to “pass the torch” of the business to someone else.​​ 

L. H. Selman, Ltd. was purchased by the family of Wes Clark, a long-time collector, who moved the business to the Fine Arts Building on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, where it resides and continues to thrive.​​ 

 ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​ ​​​​ 

Larry was a devoted father who adored his family.​​ In 1976, son Matthew (Matisse) was born, followed by son Noah in 1978. Throughout his career as a businessman,​​ he​​ always found time to be​​ 100%​​ present​​ for​​ his children,​​ constructing electronic projects at the dining room table, selling​​ (hmm.. mostly buying)​​ at the local flea market,​​ having sushi-making dinners at home​​ and​​ lifelong​​ daily conversations about their many​​ diverse​​ interests and activities.

 

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