CELEBRATE THE PAPERWEIGHT 2018

Without Putting Too Fine a Point On It…
WOW, Really? Why, Thank you,
Yes, It Was, Wasn’t it?
…and It Was All Because of You !
But Wait… There’s More –

That’s all by way of saying we have been delightfully pleased and taken aback by your responses to Celebrate the Paperweight 2018, both during and after the event.

To begin with, you took our suggestions and many of you made a full vacation week of it, from several glass lovers attending the Chicago Symphony on Thursday evening to Peter and Cheryl Swiadon dashing up to the newly opened Halim Museum of Time and Glass in Evanston.  Joan Parsley, Carl Carter and many others attended the “Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age” exhibition as our guests. If memory serves, Mike and Terri Taylor and another couple enjoyed “Hamilton” and many of you sought out the nearby Pritzker Museum. At least two of you planned to go see the newly installed titanosaur at the Field Museum.

But much of what made the week special was simply you all being together.  Gulsari Byrkit, for one, was so very happy to put faces to names and voices she’s otherwise come to know well.  Many of you stopped by Thursday night to hang out with us, have a bite and some champagne, and also to examine the entire offering for the upcoming Auction 70 in person (initial bidding begins October 15th).  Others immediately took advantage of the 15% discount coupon for attendees, good for existing gallery–owned holdings. The coupons were part of our gift bags for collectors, although the most excitement was for the paperweight umbrellas, and also the mystery sulphides (believe it!).  We also received compliments for the warm feel of the gallery, and thank you for that.

Damon MacNaught & Andrew Najarian (Photo courtesy of ArtReach Chicago)

Mayauel Ward (Photo courtesy of ArtReach Chicago)

Friday morning was not only the real beginning of our little festival, it set the tone for the rest of the weekend.  The demonstration we arranged was received enthusiastically and thoughtfully by all the attendees. Over forty of you watched David Graeber, Gordon Smith, Mayauel Ward, Damon MacNaught and Andy Najarian as they all engaged with the artist/activist Pearl Dick and her team Project Fire.  The aspirational young glassmakers from troubled areas in Chicago were enthused to learn from our artists and also show them a little something of what they could do. Boundaries were crossed, assumptions dropped and connections were made. There was even an impromptu concert by Dantrell, one of the trainees playing to the packed house, that competed with the passing elevated trains and the sounds of the glasswork and the street outside.  An immersive experience indeed. In the rear of the huge studio, Dave and Gordon had a highly focused audience as they flame-worked with finely detailed glass insects. Up front Damon and Andy amazed us all by the speed and ease with which they were able to stretch a beautiful length of blue and white glass and nimbly position it on small cross supports. It seemed that almost immediately they were able to handle the strand, cutting it and handing out samples.

Bee, by Dave Graeber

Mayauel, meanwhile was wrestling with a gorgeously glowing gather of glass / vase-to-be, with a brand new Graeber hummingbird encased within. We will be launching an auction modeled after the Hurricane Harvey auction (i.e. on Facebook for logistical reasons) to sell that as well as another lovely vase that Damon and Andy created. Gordon made a splendid little dragonfly that raised $250 in silent auction (thank you Terri) and Dave also made a special bee that he gifted to Project Fire.  Pearl’s team went to work after our boys were through and wound up creating a sublime piece – a woman’s head of clear glass festooned with perfectly spaced roses for her hair. Yes, you guessed it – Rosann Milius took ownership of that work before it left the pontil…never get between Rosann and a beautiful glass rose.

Project Fire Team (Photo courtesy of ArtReach Chicago)

Pearl Dick & Project Fire Team (Photo courtesy of ArtReach Chicago)

But the real accomplishment here was the feeling you all reported.  We’ve heard from so many of you that it was the spirits and attitudes of these young men (young ladies are coming into the program as well) that left you feeling and knowing that we had all been part of something meaningful – something out of the ordinary.  Art elevated and given even more meaning and purpose. Many of you had rewarding conversations with the students and even supported the cause by purchasing art works, both on Friday and also the next morning at the Artists’ Fair, where the Project Fire had its own table, manned by Pearl, Divontae and Dantrell.  

Members of Project Fire

Friday evening we had dinner at the Columbia Yacht Club, and we had two speakers.  Kathryn Sharbaugh of the Flint Museum spoke to the upcoming PCA convention in Dearborn (with a day trip to Flint) and enticed the attendees with descriptions of not only the two concurrent paperweight exhibitions that will be on display—but also of the newly unveiled “Glass Glass” collection.  She also spoke briefly to the larger mission occupying the museum and its personnel under the leadership of John Henry – that of taking what the art the museum has and presenting it in ways that address the specific needs of the community that has been so challenged by the water crisis. She has been helping design programs and other forms of outreach designed to connect with brains specifically damaged by lead.  (Ask her about Dolly Parton’s book program.)

Kathryn Sharbaugh of the Flint, collector Peter Swiadon, and Brad Stolbach of the University of Chicago

Lead of a different kind as in the form of a bullet, has been a present danger (along with lives filled with incredible challenges) for many of the young people of Project Fire.  Pearl along with her mentor, Brad Stolbach of the University of Chicago and Director of “Healing Hurt People-Chicago” spoke movingly of the efforts involved and the progress being made by ArtReach Chicago/Project Fire.  (A big thank you goes to Art Reach Director of Development Marine Tempels.)

We know this is running long but there was so much in such a short time in terms of meaningful experiences.  Not to leave the artists out— They outdid themselves with the beauty of the designs they brought for the Saturday morning Artists’ Fair.  The dance hall space was perfect for the occasion (thank you to the Johne Parsley legacy project for the sumptuous bouquet that anchored the center of the room) and seemed to meet everyone’s needs.  Ken Rosenfeld, Cathy Richardson and Melissa Ayotte all arrived after the demonstration but we were happy to have them for the Fair. Mike Hunter and Clinton Smith had new designs shown in absentia. (Thank you Nancy Alfano and Joan Parsley.)  And wow, this time around we received endless compliments on how good the midday sandwiches were – thank you Debbie Clark!

The Artists’ Fair

Ken Rosenfeld at the Artists’ Fair

Damon & Andrew at the Artists’ Fair

That evening we all convened at the historic Walnut Room in the Macy’s building for a closing dinner.  Everyone enjoyed having their choice of several different entrees, but all seemed to delight in the trademark Frango Mint ice cream pie dessert.  We could go on and on here, but you do have lives to get back to…

A special thank you to Larry and Marti Selman who joined us (on the eve of our golden anniversary) for the weekend and were even seen dipping an antique Clichy into water in the gallery to explain the refractive properties of glass.  Like we said, an immersive experience!

Ben Clark with Marti & Larry Selman

In closing we were going to thank you all, but you thanked us first.  Humbling. All we did was connect. So, you’re welcome and thank you back!  The Selman Gallery is looking forward to continuing a relationship with Pearl Dick and Project Fire, as well as with Kathryn Sharbaugh and John Henry at the Flint Institute of Arts.  We hope you made some new friends – we know you loved seeing old ones!

The Selman Team
Ben, Penelope, Marty, Paul and Molly…and DJ.

L.H. Selman Ltd., 69th Paperweight Auction: Summer Will Be Fun!

Below is a link to a list of the unsold lots now available at their reserve prices. This is a buy-it-now event, lots can be instantly purchased. We recommend using the list alongside the digital copy of the catalog for easy reference. You can also go directly to the Auction Website and click the tab “Reserve Prices” to take any action or view what is available directly on the auction website.

List of Reserve Prices for Unsold Lots

Click Here for Auction Website

L.H. Selman, Ltd. is pleased to announce our Summer 2018, 69th Glass Paperweight Auction, featuring 336 lots, antique and modern, as well as choice paperweight-related objects. Initial Bidding commences Monday, July 9th at 9:00 am CST. Initial bidding ends on Monday, July 23rd at 5pm CST by phone and at 11:59pm CST by Internet. The auction is fully online, hosted on our AUCTION WEBSITE. A web friendly digital e-catalog can be viewed at E-CATALOG, while a printed copy of the catalog is for sale at PRINT-CATALOG. For those of you who have enjoyed watching spin videos of featured pieces, they can be accessed via our YouTube Channel. If you see something to your liking, please do not fail to place an initial bid in order to ensure that you have a position in the competitive bidding that follows in the second half of the auction. Competitive bidding begins on Tuesday the 24th.

We recommend that you give the catalog’s Conditions of Sale a careful examination for a full understanding of the protocols, and please note that we have adjusted the language on our condition statements. A key can be found in the Conditions of Sale on page 62 of the catalog. Please call the gallery with any questions about these changes or the auction format, and don’t forget, we’re always happy to send additional images, videos or condition reports upon request.

You can also make an appointment to see every lot in person at our gallery in Chicago, 410 S. Michigan Ave., suite 207.  We would love to see you all in person! If you prefer to place any or all bids by phone, or have any questions, just give us a call at 1-800-538-0766.

On to the Goodies!

This summer we all need a break. So we recommend you pack an old fashioned picnic basket and cooler and take off in your grandfather’s 1960s Chrysler or Buick woodie station wagon with no tracking devices and disappear for a few days to a cabin on a lake after the auction of course! As was said in the Godfather, leave the iPhone, take the cannoli and the paperweights you just won at auction.

Yes, that’s right! A weekend with a few real books and a handful of your gleaming, newly acquired Selman weights to wake up to and smile over (at the break of dawn or the crack of noon – your call). Hey, it was good enough for Truman Capote!

Anyway, we all need some joy and whimsy this season and your friends at the Selman Gallery are doing their part in supplying the soul food for the party. That is to say we’ve worked hard to put together a cornucopia of choices to add to your art collection—from the classical and elegant to the simply delightful and whimsical. (Yes, the classical bring delight also, and the delightful weights required focused effort as well…)

So please enjoy some of the examples we share here with you to prepare you to anticipate to forthcoming Summer Auction 69. Look for the catalog winging its way to you or check out the digital version. And, as always – best of luck to you in your bidding!

Very rare antique Clichy close concentric millefiori and rose miniature piedouche paperweight. Est. $15,000—18,000.

Very rare antique Clichy close concentric millefiori and rose miniature piedouche paperweight. Est. $15,000—18,000.

Lot 1. You never want to claim that something is perfect, but with our Lot #1, the word does come to mind. This absolute beauty is pictured in A Garland of Weights by Frank Manheim. It is a jewel, with a beautifully centered Type I Clichy rose design and with every attendant floret and cane as alert as and well spaced as an award-winning marching band with their differently colored uniforms creating a harmonious palette.

Very rare antique Baccarat Ducks-on-a-Pond hollow faceted paperweight. Est. $14,000—16,000.

Very rare antique Baccarat Ducks-on-a-Pond hollow faceted paperweight. Est. $14,000—16,000.

Lot 2. If you can’t get away for a quiet weekend in nature, then this exquisitely rendered trio of subtly colored and striped ducks in a pond will bring some nature to you. Each of the six side facets provides a choice viewpoint with a different perspective on the little family’s progress, as they navigate in a secluded pond with the water radiating from the very center. As you turn this weight, it plays with light so well, there seems to be water within flowing imperceptibly.

Antique Bacchus white millefiori carpet ground paperweight. Est. $6,000—8,000.

Antique Bacchus white millefiori carpet ground paperweight. Est. $6,000—8,000.

Lot 4. This would be a great wedding gift. Whiter than any gown, this explosion of delicate, lacy and airy collared ruffle canes, sports a crown of rich red for celebration and a waistband spotted with deep blue for good fortune. If you don’t have a recipient yet, you need to secure this now and see if it’s possible to part with later!

Antique Saint Louis 1848 close concentric millefiori mushroom and torsade paperweight. Est. $10,000-15,000.

Antique Saint Louis 1848 close concentric millefiori mushroom and torsade paperweight. Est. $10,000-15,000.

Lot 6. Equal parts playful and serene, this arrangement is wonderfully balanced with an elegantly tapered mushroom stem allowing lots of light within, and providing a real sense of airiness. The dusty pinks, quiet greens, innocent whites and baby blues create a very soft and harmonious palette that nonetheless comes alive with a carefree pleasure. The combination of the playful pink ribbon dancing around the handsome white torsade makes for the perfect satellite. With a very elegant date cane.

Antique Baccarat dark butterfly and millefiori garland paperweight. Est. $3,500—5,000.

Antique Baccarat dark butterfly and millefiori garland paperweight. Est. $3,500—5,000.

Lot 7. This particular butterfly is so deeply rich, it looks to be velvet in places. Darkly luxurious and perfectly centered within its protective ring of arrowhead and cog canes, it is a prime example of a classic Baccarat.

Rare antique Saint Louis white pompon on tomato red latticinio paperweight. Est. $8,000—10,000.

Rare antique Saint Louis white pompon on tomato red latticinio paperweight. Est. $8,000—10,000.

Lot 8. This almost flawlessly executed pompon rests lightly on a luscious double swirl latticinio cushion. The blush-colored cushion was created by a translucent coating of red both above and beneath what is otherwise an opaque white latticinio. Check Glass Paperweights of the New York Historical Society, page 59. If you favor this be sure to ask for a photo taken of the base, you won’t believe the handmade perfection!

Antique Saint Louis end-of-day scrambled millefiori with uncommon silhouette paperweight. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Antique Saint Louis end-of-day scrambled millefiori with uncommon silhouette paperweight. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Lot 20. And you thought Jazz started in the Twenties! This jazzy, snazzy and happy explosion frozen in glass has everything – party favors, glitter, dancing and confetti—and would be right at home on the bar in any speakeasy… And just to outshine the competition it includes a wandering turkey and an uncommon double silhouette. Pass the Sax…!

Antique Clichy very rare rose and millefiori chequer paperweight. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Antique Clichy very rare rose and millefiori chequer paperweight. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Lot 26. This is one pretty weight and it boasts a very rare white and purple rose. The work has a delicate, lacy feel that is filled with light dancing through the layers of latticinio, while the pastry molds are borderline edible. But to those of you who might mistakenly feel they have enough Clichy weights, we will not sell the rose separately. All our paperweights come fully assembled!

Rare antique Clichy millefiori green chequer paperweight. Est. $8,000—10,000.

Rare antique Clichy millefiori green chequer paperweight. Est. $8,000—10,000.

Lot 28. You don’t see this beautiful pistachio green very often. This light-hearted and playful arrangement is buoyed on a cushion of white gossamer latticinio that resembles an ethereal cloud of smoke dissipating. You may actually want to alternate the weight in its stand to admire the base every other week.

Extremely rare antique English terracotta teddy bear green bottle dump. Est. $700—1,000.

Extremely rare antique English terracotta teddy bear green bottle dump. Est. $700—1,000.

Lot 70. Wearing a bubble for a derby hat, this little fur ball is embarrassingly charming. Give us a call to hear about care and feeding of this escapee from a children’s toy zoo. Honey not included.

Antique New England Glass Company hollow blown pear paperweight. Est. $400—500.

Antique New England Glass Company hollow blown pear paperweight. Est. $400—500.

Lot 73. This little pear reminds us of the fruit version of a kitten. With a nice blushing gradation, this baby fruit could slip into your shirt pocket and charm the people in your office. Call for a sample slice.

SHIFTING GLASS GEARS!

Without doing nearly enough justice to the treasures in the antiques department of the upcoming auction, our schedule and your attention spans (this is an ad, after all!) call for us to move ahead and put the blindfold back on and pick a few more summer selections at random from the living and breathing side of the artistic community!

Paul Stankard 1997 flowers, pods, root people and word canes cube paperweight. Est. $3,000-4,000.

Paul Stankard 1997 flowers, pods, root people and word canes cube paperweight. Est. $3,000-4,000.

Lot 80. And you thought the world was round!? It is whatever shape the dean says it to be! Here the world is a cube filled with life eternal and sporting every classic symbol of fecundity there is. If you were at Wheaton this year and saw Paul’s major retrospective at the museum, you know what we’re talking about, when we say “dean”. And we have one dozen Stankards to choose from this time. Yeah, you’re welcome!

David Graeber 2016 chartreuse chrysanthemum and blue roses bouquet pedestal paperweight. Est. $2,500—3,500.

David Graeber 2016 chartreuse chrysanthemum and blue roses bouquet pedestal paperweight. Est. $2,500—3,500.

Lot 90. Dave is a painter and glass is his paint box. His sought-after micro floral-scapes are absolutely brimming with flowers and vegetation and more. Here the flowers and foliage surge from their unseen core and flare out at every angle. A 360 degree world of life!

Rick Ayotte 2002 “Tranquility Rose Bouquet” upright faceted sculpture, from the Illusion series. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Rick Ayotte 2002 “Tranquility Rose Bouquet” upright faceted sculpture, from the Illusion series. Est. $2,000—3,000.

Lot 102. At almost 5 inches both in height and width, the spiral cut back on this glorious 1 of 1 edition weight strains to be called “tranquil”. We were lucky enough to gather together well over a dozen of Rick’s artworks this time around. And stay sharp, because we could only score a single Melissa piece for this auction! Look for a fight over Lot 101!

Important Saint Louis 1973 close concentric millefiori super magnum piedouche paperweight. Est. $18,000—25,000.

Important Saint Louis 1973 close concentric millefiori super magnum piedouche paperweight. Est. $18,000—25,000.

Lot 120. We need to rest after just writing about the only weight you never have to worry about being stolen by a cat burglar! In the auction catalog you’ll read the details but at 9 inches in height, 10 inches in diameter, and a 30-inch waistline, you don’t need me to tell you this is the largest paperweight ever made. (Okay, there are 11 others – but that’s it!) An edition of 12, created to honor Paul Jokelson’s accomplishments, this spectacular design debuted at the Chicago paperweight convention in 1973. Rumors that Paul passed away from trying to lift his 55 pound trophy were recently debunked, thank goodness. We’ll just say here that it took 7 glassworkers to weld the dome to its base…

Debbie Tarsitano and Max Erlacher 2003 collaborative “Basket of Doves” and flowers upright faceted paperweight. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Debbie Tarsitano and Max Erlacher 2003 collaborative “Basket of Doves” and flowers upright faceted paperweight. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Lot 128. A perfect team effort resulting in an effervescent work. This piece may cause unexpected fits of joy and happiness, so view with caution.

Ken Rosenfeld 1993 desert scene and flowers paperweight. Est. $800—1,000.

Ken Rosenfeld 1993 desert scene and flowers paperweight. Est. $800—1,000.

Lot 145. Life in creamy color bursts forth out of the sand and defies the convincing and beautifully rendered but forbidding ground around it. No water needed.

Cathy Richardson 2015 “Frog Gossip Group” paperweight. Est. $700—900.

Cathy Richardson 2015 “Frog Gossip Group” paperweight. Est. $700—900.

Lot 156. Forget the descriptive title. If you are a Northwestern alumnus, you know your blue and orange. It’s apparent in this 1 of 1 edition weight that these three characters can only be fraternity pledges looking to become princes…

Denali Crystal “Aurora” tall dichroic and crystal sculpture. Est. $4,500—5,500.

Denali Crystal “Aurora” tall dichroic and crystal sculpture. Est. $4,500—5,500.

Lot 163. Conquering this stunning, mountainous almost foot-high paean to the sheer glory of crystal at auction is a wonderful and safe alternative to trying to mount an expedition to some faraway ice covered peak. Walk around it slowly and you have 360 different works of art!

Saint Louis 1997 “Panier Flamboyant” red flower bouquet in latticinio basket magnum paperweight. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Saint Louis 1997 “Panier Flamboyant” red flower bouquet in latticinio basket magnum paperweight. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Lot 201. This lush bouquet of blossoms and buds nestled in a voluminous basket with the dome about three inches in height must be seen to be believed. This is all you’d need to set a large table. Please call for extra pictures of this.

Baccarat 1998 “Otarie danseuse” dancing seal paperweight, from the Circus series. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Baccarat 1998 “Otarie danseuse” dancing seal paperweight, from the Circus series. Est. $1,000—1,400.

Lot 218. Just in case you thought we were taking it all too seriously, here is an example of “Summer Will Be Fun” in action. The playful colors and carefree child-like scene is really, really delicious. The seal never drops the ball!

Paul Ysart three-tiered pink flower in a white latticinio stave basket paperweight. Est. $500—700.

Paul Ysart three-tiered pink flower in a white latticinio stave basket paperweight. Est. $500—700.

Lot 251. It’s a PY party with an even dozen pieces by the pioneer coming under the gavel, including this vertigo-inducing pink flower floating impossibly about a mile (or so it seems) above the bottom of the basket.

John Deacons close packed millefiori overlay faceted paperweight. Est. $500—700.

John Deacons close packed millefiori overlay faceted paperweight. Est. $500—700.

Lot 272. This is a classy execution of a classic motif. And the transparent lemon yellow is just luminous.

That’s it kids – we’re worn out so you must be also. Another embarrassment of riches and some very affordable riches at that, including but not limited to more than 30 handsome Perthshires.

Okay, You should be all set to tackle the full 336 entries coming soon to a flat screen near you or landing in your mail slot to augment your wonderful library of Selman publications.

The Fest in the Midwest

The Biennial “Celebrate the Paperweight” is Back. Plan Accordingly!

Late September Chicago is the place to be for lovers and especially lovers of fine glass paperweights! Two years ago we had to put the Selman biennial on hold in order to assist the Chicago Art Institute in the sale by auction of close to 400 duplicative weights from the Arthur Rubloff Collection and other holdings. After that smashing success for a good cause, we can now return to tradition!

Come to town by the 27th of September to settle in and stop by to have a toast at the gallery with us from 3-7pm.

Gordon Smith & David Graeber

Gordon Smith & David Graeber

Friday the 28th, We’ll be offering transportation to an all-star glassmaking demonstration at the Project Fire Studio with David Graeber, Andy Najarian, Gordon Smith and Damon MacNaught. The bus will begin boarding at 10:30am from the Congress Hotel, to arrive in time for the 11am-2pm demonstrations. Heading the Project Fire Studio is Pearl Dick, an accomplished glass artist, teacher and social activist who has engineered this operation to give at-risk youth an opportunity to create something meaningful, learn teamwork and develop technical skills that may provide a path to employment. Light lunches will be provided by the gallery. After the event you can come back to the gallery, have a beverage and examine first-hand the paperweights to be offered in the fall auction as they’ll be freshly filling the display cases.

Friday, beginning between 5:30-6pm and going until we’re thrown out, we’ll all converge at the Columbia Yacht Club aboard MV Abegweit, one of the great ships (retired) of the Great Lakes. Enjoy gorgeous views of the lake and the city skyline as the sun settles behind the panorama of “skyscrapers” in the city that gave birth to the word. Take in the Lake air with drinks in hand. Among the speakers will be the aforementioned Pearl Dick. We will also hear from Kathryn Sharbaugh, the Flint Museum curator of the “Small Worlds” Paperweight exhibition, which is running through the PCA conference next April in Dearborn. She also authored the recent and very attractive volume Paperweights: Highlights from the Flint Institute of Arts Collection. This evening will also feature gift bags, a raffle and an auction to benefit the Paperweight Foundation. In addition a portion of the ticket proceeds will be donated to them as well.

View from the Columbia Yacht Club

View from the Columbia Yacht Club

Saturday the 29th at the Fine Arts Building we’ll host the Artist Fair at 10am in a beautiful dance hall with floor to ceiling views of Grant Park. You’ll be seeing many new designs offered by many of the finest glass artists in the field. The fair will run from 10am to 3pm.

Later on Saturday we’ll get back together for dinner and a celebratory send-off at the Walnut Room for our closing dinner (6pm). “The world famous Walnut Room was the first restaurant ever opened in a department store. With Circassian paneling imported from Russia and Austrian chandeliers, the 17,000 square foot dining room is both elegant and comfortable.”

The historic Walnut Room

The historic Walnut Room

And for those of you returning home on Sunday, please feel free to stop by in the morning for a goodbye mimosa!

Please refer to the links provided and make your hotel reservations soon. We suggest you make the Celebrate the Paperweight the core of a vacation experience that may include the Art Expo, the new Halim Museum, the Art Institute’s John Singer Sargent exhibition, the play, HAMILTON, the famous Randolph Street Art Fair, and so many other attractions listed on our GUIDE to the weekend’s events.

To purchase a ticket for the event, click here.

To book your stay with the group rate at the Congress Hotel, click here. (more hotels available for recommendation)

WHY SHOULD WE BOOK “CELEBRATE THE PAPERWEIGHT” 2018 LODGINGS IN CHICAGO FOUR MONTHS OUT?

 

We’re glad you asked…

It is NOT too early to sound the horns… The planning for the 2018 CELEBRATE THE PAPERWEIGHT (September 27-29) is well underway and a good time will be had by all attending.

Here is a view of the Lake from one of the rooms - quite lovely!

Here is a view of the Lake from one of the rooms – quite lovely!

The important thing today to communicate is that there are many other events and attractions occurring that very weekend. It will be High Season and the rooms may go quickly or go up in price! The Selman Gallery has reserved 20 rooms for the 3 nights at the comfortable and convenient Congress Plaza, at $189/night, plus tax. You can book your room by clicking HERE. You must mention our gallery to get the group rate. Also, you may cancel your reservation up to a month before the dates, at no penalty (read the contract). If you choose another hotel, that is fine, but do it soon. And the hotel will honor (if rooms are available) the same rate for “shoulder dates” on either side of your reserved dates. And, if you check in and the hotel still has lake view rooms unrented past about 3 pm, they will upgrade you to a lake view at no extra charge! However, if you want to be absolutely assured of a lake view, it’s just an extra $20/night. So book soon while the lake views are still available!  Don’t take the gamble if you are hoping to see the sun come up!!

Other attractions that will bring people to Chicago at that time include the annual and massive ART EXPO on Navy Pier, and the recently opened Halim Time and Glass Museum in Evanston, offering collections of Tiffany and stained glass (and over 1,000 rare timepieces). That will also be the closing weekend to see the Art Institute’s 100-piece exhibition “John Singer Sargent and Chicago’s Gilded Age.” Also on view will be “Lest We Forget: Sailors, Sammies And Doughboys Over There In World War I” hosted by The Pritzker Military Museum, just across from the Art Institute.

For those coming in a day early you can catch Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (September 27th). For those unrepentant (Grateful) Dead Heads among you, the Dark Star Orchestra tribute band will be performing at the north side VIC Theatre on Saturday night the 29th. Sunday the 30th will not only be the last day of the Sargent/Gilded Age show, but you can also enjoy an afternoon wandering the intriguing west loop Randolph Street Market antique fair! Oh, and yes, HAMILTON, the Musical will be going strong. … And that is just scratching the surface!

For information on purchasing tickets, booking your hotel and for a schedule of events, click here.

Questions? Just check our online postings or call us!

Come for the Fest, Stay for the City!

Chicago’s at its best in the Fall!

Garden at the Art Institute of Chicago

Art Institute of Chicago gardens

Celebrate the Paperweight Schedule and Tickets

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This page serves as a landing page for quick links for tickets/hotel and schedule information. For more detailed descriptions of each event and location, click here.

To purchase a ticket for the event, click here.

To book your stay with the group rate at the Congress Hotel, click here. (more hotels available for recommendation)

If you have any questions about the schedule or experience any trouble with the links for tickets and hotel, please call us in the gallery at 312-583-1177 or email us at info@paperweight.com and we can assist as needed.


Schedule of Events

Thursday, September 27th

Welcome Reception at the L.H. Selman Gallery from 3-7pm. Those arriving on Thursday are welcome to join us for libations & cheer.

Friday, September 28th

Demonstrations at Pearl Dick’s Project Fire from 11am-2pm. Participating artists include David Graeber, Gordon Smith, Andrew Najarian & Damon MacNaught. Transportation will be provided between the Congress Hotel and Project Fire, the bus will begin boarding at 10:30am. Light lunch provided.

Dinner at the Columbia Yacht Club, beginning between 5:30-6. With breathtaking lakeside views, the evening will include dinner, drinks, musical entertainment, speakers, gift bags, a benefit auction & raffle.

Saturday, September 29th

Artists’ Fair in the Fine Arts Building, 10am-3pm. An informal get-together, with light food and refreshments.

Dinner and a celebratory send-off at the historic Walnut Room at 6pm!

Sunday, September 30th

Morning Mimosas at the gallery.

Wondering why you should book your hotel now? We’ve made a GUIDE to some of the other exciting events taking place the same weekend in Chicago.

For a digital map featuring location highlights, click here. (We will continue to add to this map, so check back).